December 2016


Two NEXUS-NY Graduates Win 76West Clean Energy Competition

Micatu Inc (NEXUS-NY Cohort 1) received the $1 million grand prize in the 76West Clean Energy Competition. Six winners out of 175 applicants were awarded funding to help develop clean energy technologies, grow their businesses, create jobs and advance New York’s clean energy economy.

Micatu makes an optical sensor that gives highly accurate voltage readings so utilities can reduce energy use, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions. CEO Michael Oshetski says this is a win for the entire region as Micatu plans to create more high-paying jobs for Upstate NY.
ChromaNanoTech Wins 76West Clean Energy CompetitionChromaNanoTech (NEXUS-NY Cohort 2) was awarded a $250,000 prize. Based in Binghamton, NY with research derived from Binghamton University, ChromaNanoTech produces a dye that keeps windows transparent, but blocks ultraviolet radiation so buildings stay cooler and air conditioning loads are reduced. Dr. Bill Bernier accepted the prize on behalf of his team.

Other clean energy startups who won prizes include Charge CCV (C4V), Besstech, DatArcs and Global Thermostat.

Applications for 76West Round 2 are open. The deadline to apply is March 13, 2017.

 

Ducted Turbines International – Producing Twice the Energy of Traditional Wind Turbines

As part of the NEXUS-NY clean energy accelerator, university researchers and pre-revenue clean energy businesses have been working towards commercializing their novel technologies. Backed by education, finances and business support provided by the NEXUS-NY program, Ducted Turbines International (DTI) found a solution that reduces the time it currently takes to return the high capital cost investment of existing small wind technologies.

Ducted Turbines InternationalCompany: Ducted Turbines International

Website: ductedturbinesinternational.com

Description: Ducted Turbines International (DTI) is a wind turbine company working to provide the lowest cost per kWh in the small turbine market (<10kW). Its wind turbine encompasses two patent pending technologies and produces twice the energy of an open bladed, traditional wind turbine of the same diameter. This solution reduces the payback period by half the time, and provides customers with a quality product designed to last more than 10 years in the field.

Location: Clarkson University | Potsdam, NY

Founding Team: Dr. Ken Visser (President and CEO, Founder); Paul Pavone (VP Product Commercialization, Founder)

NEXUS-NY Research: Thanks to the NEXUS-NY program, DTI made great technical progress on their technology and towards commercialization. Their optimized ducted wind turbine uses a specially designed aft rotor systems to accelerate the wind and increase the power output of the turbine rotor.

DTI’s first key technology is in the rotor design, which creates a proper twist of the blade to perform more efficiently than an open blade rotor in the presence of a duct. DTI’s second key technology lies in the rotor location. Ducted turbines have traditionally placed the rotor at the throat of the duct, the location of the highest velocity. DTI discovered that if the rotor is moved farther into the duct, the power output of the turbine increases dramatically.

Based on these patent pending technologies, DTI plans to concentrate on microgrids and backup tower systems for critical facilities on a smaller scale.

“Our customer discovery confirmed that it is the cost per kWh is a key driver in the business. Our approach will allow customers to generate more energy per unit cost. Our target is to cut the ROI for their money by half”, says Ken Visser.

DTI also made exciting connections with industry experts including NEXUS-NY advisor David Dussault of P1 Industries, who manufactured the turbine blades for their prototype. And they partnered with the NYS Science and Technology Law Center at Syracuse University to handle their IP landscape as they look to patent their technology.

“The small wind wind turbine market is set to expand tremendously. The market needs a less expensive and more efficient turbine. We can deliver this by focusing our attention on the IP, which is centered around an optimized integrated design approach. The rotor blades and duct need to be designed synergistically. It’s not easy, but it is doable.  This will then open up more markets by enabling increase energy harvesting at even lower wind speeds, reducing one’s overall costs,” added Visser.

Next Steps: After graduating the NEXUS-NY clean energy accelerator, Ducted Turbines International has recently completed a series of very successful wind tunnel tests at the University of Waterloo in Canada. This turbine test rig provided the data needed to validate the Computation Fluid Dynamic (CFD) modeling. DTI will soon be releasing the results of these tests, which will help them move forward to commercialization. DTI is also pursuing a NYSERDA ACE grant for alternative energies. This grant could yield up to $1 million in funding over three years.

Contact: 315.268.7687 | kvisser@clarkson.edu